William Sugg & Co

Special Street Lamps for Royal Premises & Other Locations.

  • Special Street Lamps for Royal Premises & Other Locations.

It is clear that William Sugg & Co were prepared to design and manufacture special gas lights for several royal premises and, as they don’t fit into the other categories this section has been added to provide a home for what are often really unusual, complex and beautiful gas lights.Windsor Castle special
This unusual fixture is one of several at Windsor Castle. It is particularly unusual in that it has an octagonal body with only 4 side ribs whilst pairs of glazing panels make up the other 4 corners. As you can see it has a 6 lt burner with clock and permanent pilot. The lamp is cradle mounted and has a feature chimney arrangement which carries four miniature ‘tassles’, a feature also seen on lamps at Osborne House on the Isle of Wight. It is of course topped off with the Royal Crown. These lamps are also mounted on posts and can be seen in the Blog Post for May 2018 where they were prominent during the televising of the Royal Wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle – now The Duke and Duchess of Sussex.

Crowns with cushions
Another tasselled cushion crown assembly close-up.

4 Isle of Wight
These are the Osborne House lamps, two are originals and two are replicas, including the tasselled cushions!

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Site Background & Header

The background to the site is a modern picture of Westminster, the ‘home’ of William Sugg for so many years. It was taken from the roof of The House of Lords during a visit by the Heritage Group of CIBSE in 2004 and centres on Westminster Abbey. The header carries a woodcut of ‘Vincent Works’, the Sugg factory, which might well have been visible from this vantage point. William used this on one of his letter heads. The first and oldest logo also shows the intimate connection with Westminster as it carries the Westminster portcullis with the inscription ‘en avant’ – ‘in advance’. The second logo replaced the earlier one around 1920 and was used right the way through the century until the ‘modern’ era when the ‘flame’ logo was applied to the new era of gas heating equipment with the new factory in Crawley.