Contacts

You can contact me initially through the Comment box at the bottom of any page. Alternatively use the Contact Form at the end before the Comment Box if you wish to send a file – limited to 2mb.
The email address that your comments are sent to is chris@williamsugghistory.co.uk if you prefer to write direct.
I have been known to manufacture or refurbish small quantities of real gas interior fixtures which are no longer made by Sugg Lighting.  Mostly, however, I see my task as providing spare parts and components – especially glassware and mantles for instance – to keep traditional interior gas lighting alive in the 21st C!

Small swaneck Dscf4215 260  Glassware 007 260

On the left is my small brass swan neck with No.2 gallery and clear borosilicate ‘bell’ glass manufactured for either natural gas or LPG. On the right are three sizes of glass with their respective galleries, left to right, 4.1/4″ as used for large swan necks at Sugg Lighting, No.3 (or ‘Universal’) that is a common size from the 1930’s and No.2 as used on the small swan necks. The tiny No.1 (or ‘Bijou’) gallery glassware has also been reproduced in borosilicate in a matching ‘bell’ shape in 2009. A matching gallery is not currently available. All the bell glassware is produced in clear, obscured or part obscured finish.

PLEASE NOTE THAT I AM NOW OUT OF NO.2 GALLERIES SO CAN NO LONGER PRODUCE THE SMALL SWAN NECK. IF ANYONE HAS A STOCK – OR EVEN A FEW OF THESE GALLERIES (IDEALLY BRASS) PLEASE LET ME KNOW (JULY 2015)

I do have plenty of brass No.3 galleries so would consider making a No.3 wall bracket with a No.2 OR a No.3 burner. This would traditionally use a 1/2″ diameter tube bend so is somewhat larger than the ‘small’ swan neck and takes the larger No.3 glass.


FEEDBACK

I would be happy to hear from anyone who can add to the story of William Sugg & Co either from personal recollection or through pictures of Sugg products still in use or in collections anywhere in the world. The aim will be to add these to this site as and when possible with suitable acknowledgement. When you send information please let me know if I may publish it on this site and if you wish your name to be included with the data or even added to this ‘Contacts’ section.

Now that the Other Manufacturers section is live do help to populate it by sending any information that can be added. Use the Leave a Comment space at the end of the section to ensure I see it.


SUGG FAMILY GENEALOGY

Whilst I have collected a huge amount of Sugg family data myself, by coincidence my namesake Christopher Sugg has been building a family website using his own researches and that of other Sugg researchers – including my own. We are convinced that there must be a link between our two lines principally because they both lead back to a small part of Somerset at the end of the 17th century but have so far not been able to close the loop. Those of you who would like to view this research and/or purchase (very reasonably) a nice little Sugg Migrations booklet should go to: http://homepage.ntlworld.com/csugg/origins/index.htm


USEFUL ADDRESSES:

Sugg Lighting Ltd, NEW ADDRESS 2009 Foundry Lane, Horsham, West Sussex, RH13 5PX Tel: +44 (0)1293 540111 Fax 01293 540114 sales@sugglighting.co.uk | www.sugglighting.co.uk

Institution of Gas Engineers & Managers. NEW ADDRESS 2009 IGEM House, 26 & 28 High Street, Kegworth, Derbyshire, DE74 2DA Tel +44 (0)844 375 4436 Fax 01509 678198 . general@igem.org.uk | www.igem.org.uk


HISTORIC GAS TIMES. (PHI – PANEL FOR THE HISTORY OF THE INDUSTRY). Now – 2017 – generally known as the Gas History Panel

Following the retirement of Barry Wilkinson from the Panel and Editorship of Historic Gas Times, The Institution Of Gas Engineers and Managers has taken on much of the production and mailing duties and the Editorship is being shared between John Horne and Russell Thomas.

The HISTORIC GAS TIMES

The Historic Gas Times is published four times a year. ‘To subscribe, please visit www.igem.org.uk/HGT’ Annual Subscription £8.00 (UK only) Overseas Rates (for 4 issues) £15.00 Sterling (Air Mail) Or Sent via email £6.00 World-wide Please make your cheque payable to: IGEM History Fund Please post to: HGT Subscriptions, IGEM Membership Dept., IGEM House, 28 High Street, Kegworth, Derbyshire DE74 2DA For any subscription enquiries Please telephone the Membership Department on 0844 375 4436, during office hours.

See more at http://www.igem.org.uk/about-igem/panel-for-the-history-of-the-gas-industry.aspx


SPECIALIST ENGINEERING AND APPLIANCE REFURBISHMENT:

‘Context Engineering’ the business name of Tim Martin. See examples of his work under ‘Commercial Cooking’ Contact through his email address tim@context-eng.demon.co.uk


SPECIALIST INSTALLATION AND MAINTENANCE ENGINEER FOR GAS LIGHTING AND FLAMBEAUX

ADDED 2014 Chris Warren whose business name is WG Consultants has worked with both Sugg Lighting and myself since my retirement on many specialist projects. Contact through his email address wgconsultants@hotmail.co.uk


GAS MUSEUMS AND PRESERVED GAS WORKS:

The National Gas Museum, Aylestone Road, Leicester, LE2 7QH.Tel 0116 250 3190. Check opening times prior to visit, currently Tues, Wed, Thurs 12:30 – 4:00 email address, information@gasmuseum.co.uk http://www.gasmuseum.co.uk/

Fakenham Museum of Gas and Local History UPDATED NOVEMBER 2008 Hempton Road Fakenham Norfolk NR21 7LA NEW WEBSITE AND EMAIL General enquiries: (01328) 863150 Enquiries for group visits: (01328) 863507 email: enquiries@fakenhamgasmuseum.com Website offers link to Location Map and Route Finder. Web: http://www.fakenhamgasmuseum.com

Flame – The Gasworks Museum, 44 Irish Quarter West, Carrickfergus, Northern Ireland BT38 8AT Tel: 028 93 369575 email: info@flamegasworks.co.uk http://www.flamegasworks.co.uk/

Gas Works Museum, Gas Works Road, Biggar, South Lanarkshire. The website carries latitude, longitude and grid reference and a multi map connection which provides a complete route itinery from any post code to the site from the website: http://www.geo.ed.ac.uk/scotgaz/features/featurefirst236.html Contact Tel: 01899 221050


NATIONAL GAS ARCHIVE HELD BY THE NATIONAL GRID

http://www.gasarchive.org/index.htm


CIBSE – BUILDING SERVICES ENGINEERING – HERITAGE GROUP

A wide range of historic information on building services, companies and people involved in them – including gas equipment – with an active heritage group at: Heritage Group of CIBSE www.hevac-heritage.org


GAS LIGHTING SHOP IN PARIS – & ‘GAZETTE AFEGAZ’

The ‘must visit’ gas lighting shop in Paris mentioned in the ‘collectors’ section and owned by Monsieur Ara is: Lumiere de l’Oeil, 4, rue Flatters, 75005, Paris, France Huge amount of information in 3 languages on his website: http://lumiara.perso.neuf.fr/lumiara/ NEW WEBSITE ADDRESS NOV 2008

The website for Gazette AFEGAZ is: http://members.aol.com/Afegaz/Page1.html

Series of videos about gas lighting on You Tube NEW YOU TUBE ENTRY 2011 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gmw4jJY0iXs&feature=youtu.be. And others.


STREET LIGHTING ENTHUSIASTS AND COLLECTORS WITH WEBSITES FULL OF INFORMATION – INCLUDING REFERENCES TO SUGG.

Bob Cookson. Specialist on street lighting in Eastbourne with major collection of lanterns and street lighting equipment. www.cooksonr.freeserve.co.uk

Simon Cornwall. Another major collection including catalogues and advertisements from many trade sources. www.simoncornwell.com/lighting/

(Many more to add! Several can be found via the sites above)

SPECIALIST BOOKLET “WHEN THE STREETS WERE LIT BY GAS” by Philip Tordoff. (See ‘Other Manufacturers‘)

YEOVIL HISTORY website by Robert Osborn with a section on Sugg Lamps
http://www.yeovilhistory.info/sugglamps.htm


OPEN AIR MUSEUMS.

Ironbridge Gorge Museum www.ironbridge.org.uk

Black Country Museum www.bclm.co.uk http://www.facebook.com/bclivingmuseum

Beamish – The Living Museum of the North Visit: www.beamish.org.uk beamishtransportonline.co.uk/ 2012 VisitEngland Awards for Excellence – Large Visitor Attraction of the Year Sandford Award for Heritage Education Beamish Museum Limited, Beamish, County Durham DH9 0RG Main Switchboard – Tel. 0191 370 4000


 HERITAGE RAILWAYS – FREQUENTLY WITH WORKING GAS LIGHTS

The Bluebell Railway Preservation Society, Sheffield Park, East Sussex has gas lighting on the platforms and access roads and walkways, much of it with Sugg connections. Lots of detail on their multi lingual website: www.bluebell-railway.co.uk/

The Keighley & Worth Valley Railway in Yorkshire has a first class website at: www.kwvr.co.uk/ They have some 73 gas lamps of which about half are of Sugg manufacture.

Severn Valley Railway has lots of information on their website: www.svr.co.uk/

West Somerset Railway. www.west-somerset-railway.co.uk/


GAS LIT PUBS AND OTHER BUILDINGS

The Craven Arms, Appletreewick, Nr Skipton, North Yorks BD23 6BN. (Inverted mantle burners)

Craven Arms inside 2 bar 260

The Hat and Feathers, 2 Clerkenwell Road, London,EC1M 5PQ. (Open flame)

Hat & Feathers 001 260

Gas Lit Churches

St Johns Methodist Church, Ashbrooke Road, Sunderland, SR2 7HQ

St John's, Ashbrooke 3 260

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 Copyright © Chris Sugg 2006-13      Top of page

35 comments on “Contacts
  1. Simon Bushell says:

    Hi

    Looking at the Lamp Post Church Street/East Street Petworth.

    This is a Grade 2 listed structure accredited to Charles Barry. I guess Suggs would be the most likely maker. Sadley it does not have the original lantern, these were remove prior 1947 pictures. I have seen an early image of it with four lanterns. The side ones may well have been to easily hit with vehicles.

    Any comments on this?

    • Chris Sugg says:

      Hello Simon. I have driven past this post many times over the years and also noticed the handsome cradle bracket that needs a lamp on a house nearby! This post group worries me from several points of view! It appears to have a central post which is plain with 3 ‘barley sugar’ posts equi-spaced around it. All the posts appear to have been extended with decorative sections that have been added on top of the classic spigot point above the twist so my first thought is that the additions are much later than the original posts. Early posts were always short because the lamps were often only single open flames. To get more light they had to use larger burners requiring larger lanterns, however one other possibility would be to add extra lanterns to the same location which may be what, unusually, has happened here. I would really like to see the picture with 4 lamps as it could explain a lot. If you go to ‘Location Pictures’ and wind down you will eventually come to the Barry designed posts and Globe lanterns along the front of the House of Lords that we made at Sugg Lighting to an original Barry illustration. I think the original had 3 flames but we were asked for a 6 lt burner which was quite a challenge! If you can provide more information, particularly the early photo, I would be happy to comment further.

      • Simon Bushell says:

        Hi Chris

        Thank you for the comments. The picture I found was on this site;
        (http://www.gravelroots.net/history/83.html#571)

        It is not the main first picture you see, but the one featured in the right hand column.

        Regards

        Simon

        • Chris Sugg says:

          The 3 extra lamps are mounted projecting sideways so your guess that they were removed because of the increase in physically larger traffic is almost certainly correct. The lamp on the top looks similar to those in the garden at the Brighton Pavilion which were originally top glazed later filled in with metal panels in order to reflect the light downwards and mount an electric conversion. The side lamps do not look like gas lamps as they do not have typical chimneys. If you want to research this fixture you need to search local documentation and even newspapers for more photos and somebody, sometime will have recorded its purchase and maybe its conversion to electricity.

          • Simon Bushell says:

            Chris

            Thank you for the comments, I will do some digging and see what come up. Any news I let you know.

            Best regards

            Simon

  2. Hi
    I am about to start a restoration/conversion of a Littleton 2/3 lt lamp and would like to source a replacement glass dome. It is 7 1/2″ diameter.
    Can you please offer any advice?
    Regards
    Chris

    • Chris Sugg says:

      Hello Chris,
      I can provide a globe for the 2/3 lt Littleton or, indeed, any of the Rochester or Littleton sizes. These globes are all made using high temperature borosilicate glass which is of course ideal for the application. If you go to the ‘Market Place’ section you will see my comment about these globes and an illustration of a few. They are usually made to order. The dimensions are included on the Rochester & Littleton section.

  3. Hi there, my grandfather was Walter Clarence Sugg. I knew him for 25 years but not a lot about him. He owned his own shop, grocers i think in London, have you heard of him please

    • Chris Sugg says:

      Hi Kerri,
      I thought I replied to this before so apologies if it appears elsewhere! I don’t have a Walter Clarence on my tree list although I do have two Walters! I suggest that you look at my namesake Chris Sugg’s family information that you can find by going to the ‘contacts’ section of my website and wind down a short way to the information headed Sugg Family Genealogy. Good luck.

  4. Rono Kahumbu Turner says:

    Hi Chris,
    I work with antique lighting and we are having a significant tidy up at our workshop, we have come across some Sugg gas lights and I wondered if you had any interest in them. They are 5 twin swan neck wall lights with number 3 galleries. They are in good original condition but lack shades and some of the thumb bolts for the galleries. If you are interested, contact me via my email and I will send photos.
    Many thanks,
    Rono

  5. Steff Barnes says:

    We’ve just published an article about Sugg’s gas lighting. Our Town Hall was converted to the Sugg system in 1907 and you can read the article on out site here:
    http://www.picturepenzance.com/threads/new-gas-lamps-and-redecorated-st-johns-hall-1907.1910/

    I’m researching where else in the town of Penzance in Cornwall we utilised the Sugg system during the 1900s

    • Chris Sugg says:

      Dear Steff, thank you for letting me know about your article and providing a link back to this site. I would be delighted to hear about any historic Sugg lighting – or any other product you come across in your researches. If you have any photos I would be happy to add them to the site. Chris

  6. Rick says:

    Hello, I found in my loft an old poster showing different gas lamps and columns in London. It is same as the top image on this page. http://williamsugghistory.co.uk/?page_id=63

    Do you know if Sugg company produced the poster, and how much it would be worth?

    Thank you

    • Chris Sugg says:

      Hello Rick. When we started making gas lamps again after the original company had been taken over, we found an old acetate of this poster and used it to reproduce many for promotional purposes at exhibitions etc. It was printed more than once with the earlier ones being on lighter and better paper compared to a second run. They are lovely things although quite large if anyone wishes to frame them and hang them up. I don’t actually know if and when they were printed originally as I have never seen one older than ours which must date to around 1980 – so not exactly old! Like all these things it is worth what anyone is prepared to pay for it! You will find out by offering it on eBay I guess. Don’t forget to put the size! Chris

  7. John Hilsley says:

    Hello Chris
    I am restoring a Mercury Gas Lighting system just now which produced gas from petrol back around 1910. I was just wondering if you or any of your members would be interested in seeing some pictures. I am nearly at the stage of producing the first Gas/vapour to try on my gas mantle lights so quite excited and apprehensive. This system I found on the farm where I live and had been left to the elements for a hundred years or so but I have managed to bring it back to life using probably 95% of the original equipment. I have lots of photos and a bit of information about the design and renovation, I think this will be the only working example left in the world to my knowledge as most of them would have been scrapped when electricity came in. Let me know if you are interested and we can take it from there. I expect some of the lights used back then for this contraption would have been Suggs but not sure.

    Best wishes

    John

    • Chris Sugg says:

      Hello John,
      How exciting! I am sure everyone would like to see your pictures if you would send them to me. If you have lots you could use dropbox or send me small versions to choose from. I can build a new section if it doesn’t obviously fit in an existing one! Do you have some lights to use the gas on? Look forward to seeing them. Many thanks, Chris

  8. Paula Jarvis says:

    Good Morning – while researching something I stumbled upon this website due to it’s reference to Henry Greene & Sons. Can you tell me what “JOGL” and a year citing stands for. Example: JOGL 8th March 1892

    Although I know this does not really apply to the purpose of your web-site, which is quite informative, it would help me to know.

    Many thanks

    • Chris Sugg says:

      Paula this is a reference to the Journal of Gas Lighting (JOGL) and the date of issue. If you need to see the issue you can go to the library of the Institution of Gas Engineers where they have a full set. Information on the site under ‘contacts’

  9. Annie Gray says:

    Hi,

    I’m trying to find out more about the Windsor Confectioner’s Ovens – very specific stuff, including installation date, any records of where they were originally installed, whether the gas main needed changing etc. The Royal and National Archives have very little on it. It’s for a book, A Greedy Queen, due out with Profile Books in 2017 and looking at Queen Victoria and her food. I’ll contact Tim Martin as well, but all and info would be very gratefully received!

    Cheers,
    annie

    • Chris Sugg says:

      Hello Annie, I have sent by separate email a larger version of the “Royal Confectioner” catalogue page plus the specification and several other pages from the same catalogue. I am afraid there are no records extant of sales or installations although it does appear that the Company did do installation work. The picture of the Works foreman on Tower Bridge indicates this. Go to section 4 of the History pages and wind back up past the Buckingham Palace pictures to arrive at the Tower Bridge pictures. It looks like the installation will date from 1907.
      I visited the main Buckingham Palace kitchen at the time of gas conversion to natural gas because they were having trouble with the burners on a low stock pot cooker. The kitchen had a whole range of massive Sugg appliances including I think 2 ovens, one of which may have been a ‘Confectioner’. The chef said that he really liked the old ovens because they held the heat – I guess a bit like an AGA these days. The equipment included a huge spit driven by a fan rotated by the hot air going up the chimney.
      Many years later I attempted to arrange a visit only to discover to my horror that all the old equipment had been scrapped. The Windsor Castle unit was also scrapped at some point but the front of it was rescued and set up in the Gas Museum which itself was pulled down when the Industry lost its gas Regions. It just may have been transported to the one remaining Gas Museum at Leicester but it is not on show there. I will find out if it is in the large store and let you know.

  10. Ian Caunter says:

    Dear Sir,

    I have a working Winsor gas lamp working on natural gas with three mantles. Currently I light the lamp using a street lamp lighters pole. However this tends to be a little tricky from time and damages mantles.
    Do you know of any remote control lighter that would fit this lamp please? I do not have electricity at the post so it would need to be battery operated or similar.

    • Chris Sugg says:

      If you have no electricity you have two possibilities. Firstly to use a second hand original clockwork ‘controller’ such as the Horstmann 3aUni which runs for 15 days between windings or to ask Sugg Lighting for their latest electronic ignition system which is either battery operated or makes use of solar power. Look in contacts for their number.

  11. Christopher Reader says:

    Dear Chris

    We were in contact some years ago and you confirmed that we are related – both of us being great grandsons of William Sugg.
    You have done a fabulous job of preserving – and indeed celebrating – the achievements of a remarkable man through your websites. My son is moving to the UK soon and I will be in London between 18 and 28 June. I would like to give him a sense of belonging in your country by showing him some Sugg street lights. Please be so kind and send me a list of sites that we can visit in a day or two. I would be most grateful.
    Yours, Chris
    Telephone +2721 762 2739 – Cape Town South Africa

    • Chris Sugg says:

      Hello Chris, Good to hear from you and that you are coming to London. The most obvious places to see original William Sugg lamps are in the area known as New Palace Yard in front of Big Ben at the Houses of Parliament and on the front wall of Buckingham Palace and in the garden round the side of the Palace. These are original and around 100 years old but you can also see gas lamps that we made at Sugg Lighting running down the front of the House of Lords at the opposite end of the Houses of Parliament from Big Ben. (There are some identical but electric versions so see if you can spot them!) There are also many gas lamps in the Royal Parks many of which have now had electronic ignition systems added by Sugg Lighting. Westminster has many gas lamps as probably the oldest area of London that was gaslit and of course was the home of William Sugg & Co. I am hoping to archive all the information I have collected in the Westminster archive in due course. If you would like to meet I will send you contact details by email. Regards, Chris

  12. Martin Hill says:

    Demonstration of Flatt Flame Burners

    Hi Chris

    You can add this to the news page as a modern demonstration of slit union, union and batswing gas burners using a gas mixture, to give a bright steady light that lit the Victorian world for most of the nineteenth century.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eMRFUiuVJrk

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ueJUVpD9W_k

    • Chris Sugg says:

      Hi Martin, Nice little demonstration but you are using a special gas make up that not many people will be able to obtain. We spent quite some time at Sugg Lighting obtaining an open flame that worked realistically on natural gas. It required a small amount of primary air introduced to prevent lift-off and provide a bit of colour for a gas that has no carbon particles that added colour in town gas.It does, however, show the difference in flame shape very nicely.

  13. Frank McNeill says:

    Dear Chris,

    I stumbled across your web site while doing a Google search for gas lantern burners. Very nice!

    Can you tell me where I can buy open flame and mantle burners in the UK?
    I’ve made my own lantern and need to buy the gas workings. I need LPG and we are located rurally.

    I’m in Australia so I need a supplier that’s prepared to ship down here.

    Kind Regards,

    Frank

    • Chris Sugg says:

      Hello Frank. I guess I have to start by asking what sort of size lantern you have made. Traditional gas street lamps like the Windsor are surprisingly big when you see them at ground level and there are all sorts of features to make them wind and weatherproof and provide access to the interior. If you look at the section on the Windsor lamp it will give you a lot of clues as to how it works and you will also see that the inverted mantle burners are mounted close to the reflector. If you want to replicate the much earlier open flame burner the flame will normally be roughly central on the height of the side panels and of course central on the chimney. Many early open flame will not have a reflector and the top of the lamp may well be glazed with clear or opaque glass. There is lots of detail about how lamps developed on the site and it would pay to run through information on the development to make sure your lamp operates properly. The size of the lamp would determine the size of the burner and you have to decide how you want to control it. My old company, Sugg Lighting,(contact details in Contacts) would be able to supply you with a burner for operation on LPG and I think they have a fully automated solar ignition and control system for mantle burners – but don’t forget I am 10 years out of involvement now so they would need to ask you all the questions and probably suggest a drawing and photo. If you want to send me the information I will do my best to help. Regards, Chris

  14. Philip Ellis says:

    Hi Chris I sent you a photo of my Littleton lamp mounted on a swan neck lamp post a couple of years ago I have a collection of interior gas fittings I wonder if you would like pictures of these as well

    Phil

    • Chris Sugg says:

      Hello Phil, always interested in gas lighting fixtures so do send your pictures. Are any of them in use, in which case let’s see them lit!, Chris

  15. Raymond Tilney says:

    Hello Chris,
    I have 6 Windsor street lamps which I secured when working for British Gas.
    I am trying to polish them up before using an Everbrite sealer.
    I have tried to polish using brasso and brasso mesh wool, but the tops remain resolutely black.
    Can you give me any idea what to do or where to get a product that might work?
    I have photos but cannot get the Sugg lighting website to open, it seems broken.
    Can you help please.
    I can send photos if you can send me an email address.
    Regards
    Ray.

    • Chris Sugg says:

      Hello Ray, Are these full size 16″ street lamps? Not that it makes any difference from the point of view of the material from which they are manufactured unless they are very old ones made in the 30’s when they were made from both copper and tinned steel, the latter being more economical at the time and of course all lamps were painted – usually green – with a long lasting oil paint. When we made Windsor lamps at Sugg Lighting – and I guess still these days, we had them polished and then they were high temperature lacquered which is a tough surface.
      Have you tried working on an area that would not have been lacquered – say the inside of the tent? If there is a lacquer you will have to try a strong paint stripper to tart with. When I get polishing done for the odd fixture I make I am always surprised at how much energy is required to get the surface bright and shiny. The polishing mops used are several horsepower and they use an abrasive compound to cut through the oxide layer. If they apply the mop to a lacquered part it takes even more pressure and you can see the lacquer heat up and almost ripple as it is removed.
      I would be very happy to look at your pictures and you can send them to the chris@williamsugghistory.co.uk email address.

  16. Chris Sugg says:

    In response to receipt of photos from Ray Tilney, I replied:
    Ray,
    It sounds as if you have the 14” and 9” Windsors and they are definitely ones we made at Sugg Lighting so they are copper for sure. I said in my last email that it requires a lot of energy and if they have been in your garden for 20 years this has given plenty of time for weathering. However, I suspect these were high temperature lacquered as that was the norm at the time. Did you try applying yourself to the inside of the tent? Of course you could take the lamps to a polisher and let him have a go. Apart from finding one with sufficient knowledge and suitable equipment it would probably cost a lot. I use a polisher south of Haywards Heath if you wish to go down this route! (I imagine that you are still in the Sheffield area so not very practical but you could doubtless find a closer workshop)
    Kind regards, Chris

  17. Reg says:

    Hello Chris – I have just discovered your website and wonder if you would be able to help me regarding a railway hand lamp in my possession. It is made by the Lamp Maunfacturing & Railway Supplies Co. and has a brass label stamped LNER Initial research would suggest that it is to their Welch design but I would be interested to find out some further information. If I were to send you a photo of the lamp would you be able to provide me with any additional detail as to its original function and perhaps its period of use?
    Kind regards
    Reg

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